Despot Stefan Lazarevic (1402-1427)

Silver "horn" dinar. 16mm, 1g.

Obverse: Ox-horned helmet (heraldic symbol of the Hrebeljanovic-Lazarevic dynasty) facing to the left within the circle. Serbian Cyrillic legend: СТЕФАНb ДЕСПОТ (STEFAN DESPOT) around. 2 triple dotted marks and 1 4 dotted cluster above the helmet. Single star on the right side.

Reverse: Enthroned Christ in glory (mandorla), facing, blessing with the right hand and holding book of gospels. IC XC (Jesus Christ) above. 2 stars, 1 on each side.

Reference: Jov. 49-2, LJ (XIII-30), D 279 45-49.

Comment: Very very rare type in excellent condition, very well preserved and in a lovely natural patina. Plenty of detail with just couple letters missing on the left side on the obverse.

There are only 6 registered examples.

Stefan received the title of despot from the Byzantines in 1402.

Becoming a Hungarian ally in 1403-1404, he received large possessions, including the important Belgrade and Golubac Fortress. He also held the superior rank in the Order of the Dragon. During his reign there was a long conflict with his nephew Đurađ Branković, which ended in 1412. Stefan also inherited Zeta, and waged war against Venice. Since he was childless, he designated his nephew Đurađ as heir in 1426, a year before his death.

Reference: #STL24

Not For Sale

Estimated Value: £700-£800

 
 


Despot Stefan Lazarevic (1402-1427)

Silver reduced "horn" dinar. 13mm, 0.5g.

Obverse: Ox-horned helmet (heraldic symbol of the Hrebeljanovic-Lazarevic dynasty), 4 pellets between horns. Incomplete Latin legend: CONTE S EIFAV (CONTE STEFAN - Prince or Duke Stefan) around. Single dot under helmet possibly part of a flower.

Reverse: Head of facing Christ, cross behind, Latin legend: +IESVS .CRISTVS N (Jesus Christ) around.

Reference: Jov. 41 5, I (42.10), D 225/12 70.

Comment: Very rare type with only 17 registered examples. Every example has incomplete text. Because of shallow dies excellent examples are non existent. Moneyer marks are always between horns on the obverse. Still this example is very well preserved and with very nice patina and natural brown toning. After dot on reverse Christ title starts with what appears to be ꙋ ⟨оу⟩ but in this instance it must meant to be a letter C. It is possible that moneyer looking for letter C picked letter ꙋ ⟨оу⟩.

On the domestic front, he broke the resistance of the Serbian nobles, and used the periods of peace to strengthen Serbia politically, economically, culturally and militarily.
In 1412 he issued the Code of Mines, with a separate section on governing of Novo Brdo – the largest mine in the Balkans at that time. This code increased the development of mining in Serbia, which had been the main economic backbone of the Serbian Despotate. At the time of his death, Serbia was one of the largest silver producers in Europe.
In the field of architecture, he continued development of the Morava school. His reign and personal literary works are sometimes associated with early signs of the Renaissance in the Serbian lands. He introduced knightly tournaments, modern battle tactics, and firearms to Serbia.

Reference: #STL26

Not For Sale

Estimated Value: £300-£400

 
 


Despot Stefan Lazarevic (1402-1427)

Silver reduced "horn" dinar. 13mm, 0.5g.

Obverse: Ox-horned helmet (heraldic symbol of the Hrebeljanovic-Lazarevic dynasty), 4 pellets between horns which are ending with a circle. Latin legend: CON STE (Prince or Duke Stefan).

Reverse: Christ enthroned, holding Book of Gospels, unclear initials possibly meant IC XC ("Jesus Christ"), siglas flat S to the sides and a B on the right side..

Reference: J 160, Jov. 41-2, LJ (XIII-31,32) I (42.12), D 226 72-76.

Comment: Very scarce type, associated with the late-19th century Rudnik hoard of Despot Stefan. With its 1988 publication there total number of known specimens was brought to 65. Ivanovic in his book claims that there are only 36 registered examples.

Stefan Lazarević was born, probably, in 1377 in Kruševac, the capital of his father, Prince Lazar. After the Battle of Kosovo on 15 June 1389, where his father was killed, Stefan became the new Serbian prince, but before he became of age the state was ruled by his mother, Princess Milica. In the battle of Kosovo in 1389, both rulers were killed, the Serbian Prince Lazar and Ottoman Sultan Murad I, which is very rare in history. (Murad I was the first and the last Ottoman ruler who was killed on the battlefield).

Reference: #STL11

Not For Sale

Estimated Value: £200-£300

 
 


Despot Stefan Lazarevic (1402-1427)

Silver reduced "horn" dinar. 12mm, 0.4g.

Obverse: Ox-horned helmet (heraldic symbol of the Hrebeljanovic-Lazarevic dynasty) and large shield with large one-headed eagle with raised wings on it. Serbian Cyrillic legend: ДЕСПOТ (DESPOT).

Reverse: Christ in glory (mandorla), facing, holding Gospels, IC XC (Jesus Christ).

Reference: Jov. 41-23, LJ (XIII-29), I (42.19), D 280/1 50.

Comment: Very scarce type, associated with the late-19th century Rudnik hoard of Despot Stefan mentioned above.

There are only 31 registered examples.

He came to the throne in a specific time for the state of Lazarević, who found herself surrounded by powerful neighbors. On one side was Bayezid I, who withdrew after the Battle of Kosovo in order to consolidate his power among the Ottomans, while next door there was Vuk Branković, the husband of Stefan's sister Mara, who after the battle became the most powerful of Serbian aristocrats. The neighbor on the west was Bosnian king Tvrtko I (1353–1377 ban, king 1377–1391) which was considered the legitimate successor of Nemanjić crown and he portrayed Battle of Kosovo like his own victory over the Ottomans, while their possessions in the north bordering with Hungary, King Sigismund.


Reference: #STL09

Not For Sale

Estimated Value: £150-£250

Stefan Lazarevic Coat of Arms

 


Despot Stefan Lazarevic (1402-1427)

Silver reduced "horn" dinar. 13mm, 0.4g.

Obverse: Ox-horned helmet (heraldic symbol of the Hrebeljanovic-Lazarevic dynasty) and large shield with two-headed eagle with raised wings on it. Serbian Cyrillic legend: ДЕСПOТb (DESPOT).

Reverse: Christ in glory (mandorla), facing, holding Gospels, IC XC ("Jesus Christ").

Reference: Jov. 41-23, LJ (XIII-29), I (42.19), D 280/1 50.

Comment: Another very scarce type, like the one above but with a extra letter on the obverse and shield appear to have two-headed eagle instead of one-headed.

On 7th July 1389, three weeks after the battle, Sigismund sent his palatin Nicholas II Garay to negotiate with Vuk Branković about things that are in his and Serbian favor, where he confirmed in advance any agreements that they have achieved. Although both Nicholas and Vuk were married with sisters of Stefan, it was not uncommon at the time that strong neighbors, even relatives, to suppress the legitimate heirs to throne as juvenile. The outcome of these negotiations is not known, but already in the fall, Sigismund began an offensive against young Serbian prince Stefan. His forces have crossed the Sava River in October and early November were they occupied the fortresses of Borač and Čestin, at presents Kragujevac.

 

Reference: #STL10

Not For Sale

Estimated Value: £150-£200

 
 

Despot Stefan Lazarevic (1402-1427)

Silver "double cross" dinar. 18mm, 1.2g.

Obverse: Despot Stefan standing, facing and holding short double cross. Serbian Cyrillic legend: СТЕФ. ДЕСПОТ (STEFAN DESPOT) around. Sigla Д on the right side. 

Reverse: Enthroned Christ in glory (mandorla), facing, blessing with the right hand and holding book of gospels. IC XC (Jesus Christ) above. Single star on the right side.

Reference: J 41-64, Jov 41-65, Compare to D 244 1 and 245 1.

Comment: Extremely rare type, in a lovely natural patina. Image worn but all letters visible. Very hard to find and very interesting type. Sigla Д on reverse next to Despot Stefan is, on some examples, replaced by a star or letter Г.

There are only 4 registered examples.

One of the main reasons Stefan honored vassal obligations was his sister Olivera that was married to Bayezid in order to keep peace. Olivera was at the same time a kind of hostage. Stephen loved his sister and Bayezid knew this as his weakness. In fact, Stefan's attacks on the Tatars which surrounded the Sultan were desperate attempts to rescue his sister, but with no success. She was later released, through an agreement that was signed between Stefan and Timur. It seems that a ransom wasn't paid, thanks to the great respect that Timur had for Olivera's brother Stefan, and she returned to Serbia (Spring 1403) and a little later she settled permanently in Stefan's castle, in Belgrade. On the other hand, Timur's forces had already left Asia Minor in 1403, and Timur himself died in early 1405, during his expedition to China. In the Ottoman Empire, Bayezid's capture by Timur, and then his death, brought on a civil war between his sons for throne.


Reference: #STL25

Not For Sale

Estimated Value: £700-£800

 
 

Despot Stefan Lazarevic (1402-1427)

Silver reduced "eagle" dinar. 14mm, 0.7g.

Obverse: Double-headed eagle with the wings spread wide and open claws, standing, no legend.

Reverse: Christ with a granulated nimbus is depicted standing in mandorla holding Book of the Gospels in his left hand. Large distorted initials C X ("Jesus Christ") in the middle to the sides.

Reference: Jov. 41-25, I (42.18).

Comment: Excellent condition for this type as they are usually found in very bad state. Double struck dots around on the obverse. Very rare type, only 26 registered examples with a rare and early depiction of the Serbian royal and later state symbol, the double-headed eagle.

The double-headed eagle was adopted in medieval Serbia from Etruscan Culture. The Etruscan civilization flourished in central Italy between the 8th and 3rd century BCE. The culture was renowned in antiquity for its rich mineral resources and as a major Mediterranean trading power. Much of its culture and even history was either obliterated or assimilated into that of its conqueror, Rome.

The common misconception is that it was adopted from late Byzantine influence, however it has been disproved by credited historians.

Reference: #STL19

Not For Sale

Estimated Value: £300-£400

 

Stefan Lazarevic Coat of Arms from the Council of Constance 1415

Despot Stefan Lazarevic (1402-1427)

Silver reduced "eagle" dinar. 13mm, 0.6g.

Obverse: Double-headed eagle with the wings spread wide and open claws, standing, no legend. 5 dots around.

Reverse: Christ with a granulated nimbus is depicted standing in mandorla holding book of the gospels in his left hand. Large distorted initials C X ("Jesus Christ") in the middle to the sides.

Reference: Jov. 41-25, I (42.18)

Comment: Very good condition of a very rare type, only 26 registered examples. Double-headed eagle originated from the medieval Nemanjić dynasty. 

The oldest preserved Nemanjić dynasty double-headed eagle in historical sources is depicted on the ktetor portrait of Miroslav of Hum in the Church of St. Peter and Paul in Bijelo Polje, dating to 1190. It had the following characteristics: one neck and two heads, collars on the neck and tail, spread wings, a tail in the shape of fleur-de-lis, heads higher than wings, feet have three toes, the eagle is within a circle. This type of Nemanjić eagle developed between the 12th and 15th centuries.


Order info: #STL20

NotFor Sale.

Estimated Value: £200-£300

 
 


Despot Stefan Lazarevic (1402-1427)

Silver reduced "eagle" dinar. 13mm, 0.7g.

Obverse: Double-headed eagle with the wings spread wide and open claws, standing, no legend. 2 dots to the sides.

Reverse: Christ with a granulated nimbus is depicted standing in mandorla holding book of the gospels in his left hand. Large distorted initials C X ("Jesus Christ") in the middle to the sides.

Reference: Jov. 41-25, I (42.18)

Comment: Good condition for this very rare type. Double struck dots around on the obverse, only 26 registered examples. 

The Nemanjić double-headed eagle was depicted on the details of ornaments and textile in the Žiča monastery (1207–1220), in the Church of Our Lady of Ljeviš (1307–1310), the decoration of Jovan Oliver's clothing (1349), detail on textile from Veluće Monastery (14th), a detail in the Resava Monastery (1402–1427), on the plate of Ivan Crnojević's coat of arms, as well as in other monasteries and churches.

Order info: #STL21

NotFor Sale.

Estimated Value: £200-£300

 
 


Despot Stefan Lazarevic (1402-1427)

Silver reduced "eagle" dinar. 12mm, 0.7g.

Obverse: Double-headed eagle with the wings spread wide and open claws, standing, no legend. 2 dots to the sides.

Reverse: Christ with a granulated nimbus is depicted standing in mandorla holding book of the gospels in his left hand. Large distorted initials C X ("Jesus Christ") in the middle to the sides.

Reference: Jov. 41-25, I (42.18).

Comment: Good condition for this very rare type. Double struck dots around on the obverse, only 26 registered examples. 

Beginning in the 14th century, the double-headed eagle can be seen more often on inscriptions, medieval frescoes and embroidery on the clothes of Serbian royalty. The Serbian Church adopted it, with the entrance of Žiča, the seat of the Serbian Archbishopric in the 1219–1253 period and by tradition the coronation church of the Serbian kings was engraved with the double-headed eagle. The survived golden ring of Queen Teodora (1321–1322) has the symbol engraved. During the reign of Emperor Stefan Dušan (1331–1355), the double-headed eagle can be seen on everyday objects and state related documents, such as wax stamps and decrees. In 1339, map maker, Angelino Dulcert, marked the Serbian Empire with a flag with a red double-headed eagle.

Order info: #STL22

NotFor Sale.

Estimated Value: £200-£300

 
 


Despot Stefan Lazarevic (1402-1427)

Silver reduced "eagle" dinar. 13mm, 0.3g.

Obverse: Cross in the middle with no pellets in quarters. Serbian Cyrillic legend: ДЕСПОТ СТEФAН (DESPOT STEFAN) around.

Reverse: Double-headed eagle with the wings spread wide and open claws, standing, no legend. 2 dots to the sides.

Reference: Jov. 41-24, I (42.17).

Comment: Very rare type with lovely natural brown patina and toning. In uncleaned condition with clear detail. There were only 6 known examples but the present total is considered to be under 15. Like example below this is early depiction of the Serbian royal symbol, the double-headed eagle.

Reference: #STL27

Not For Sale

Estimated Value: £250-£350

 
 


Despot Stefan Lazarevic (1402-1427)

Silver reduced "eagle" dinar. 14mm, 0.5g.

Obverse: Cross in the middle with 4 pellets, 1 in each quarter. Serbian Cyrillic legend: +ДЕСПОТ СТФН (DESPOT STEFAN) around.

Reverse: Double-headed eagle with the wings spread wide and open claws, standing, no legend. 4 dots to sides.

Reference: Jov. 41-24, I (42.17).

Comment: Very rare type, from the late-19th century Rudnik hoard of Despot Stefan's, with its 1988 publication there were only 6 known examples; the present total is considered to be under 15. Like above this is a rare and early depiction of the Serbian royal symbol, the double-headed eagle.


Reference: #STL08

Not For Sale

Estimated Value: £200-£300

 
 


Despot Stefan Lazarevic (1402-1427)

Silver "eagle" dinar. 18mm, 0.8g.

Obverse: Double-headed eagle with wide spread wings and open beak. Serbian legend: СТЕФАН ДЕСПОТ (STEFAN DESPOT) around.

Reverse: Christ in glory, initials IC XC (Jesus Christ) unusually in the middle next to Jesus, lilies in the field on each side and triple dotted mark on the right side.

Reference: J 186, Jov. 41-57, I (42.35), D 274 44.

Comment: First but different from above examples, depiction of two-headed eagle which is still a symbol of the Serbian State. There are only 20 registered examples.

Other Serbian dynasties also adopted the symbol, like the Mrnjavčević and Lazarević ruling families. Prince Lazar (1371–1389), when renovating the Hilandar monastery of Mount Athos, engraved the double-headed eagle at the northern wall. The Codex Monacensis Slavicus 4 (1371–1389) has richly attested artwork of the Serbian eagle. The double-headed eagle was officially adopted by Stefan Lazarević after he received the despot title, the second highest Byzantine title, by John VII Palaiologos in August 1402 at the court in Constantinople.

Reference: #STL06

Not For Sale

Estimated Value: £200-£300

 
 


Despot Stefan Lazarevic (1402-1427)

Silver "eagle" dinar. 17mm, 0.8g.

Obverse: Double-headed eagle with wide spread wings and open beak. Serbian legend: СТЕФАН ДЕСПОТ (STEFAN DESPOT) around.

Reverse: Christ in glory, initials IC XC (Jesus Christ) unusually in the middle next to Jesus, lilies in the field on each side and triple dotted mark on the right side.

Reference: J 186, Jov. 41-57, I (42.35).

Comment: Slightly different variant in shape and size from above.

After the Ottoman invasion and subsequent occupation that lasted until the early 19th century, the double-headed eagle was forbidden to be used as it was a symbol of Serbian sovereignty and statehood. The Serbian cross with four fire-steels ("ocila") came into greater use as another symbol of Serbs as it also was used in the Middle Ages. The emblem has mostly been depicted as a white eagle since 1804, when Stefan Gavrilović, 18th-19th century Serbian painter known best for his iconostasis and frescoes, issued a revolutionary flag based on the Nemanjic eagle for the First Serbian Uprising against the Ottoman Empire.

The eagle, defaced with the cross, has been used in the contemporary design of the coat of arms of Serbia following the tradition established by the Kingdom of Serbia in 1882. The Serbian Revolution resurrected the Nemanjić tradition, and the white double-headed eagle became the symbol of Serbia as the coat of arms following independence from the Ottoman Empire. The Serbian cross has been used as the shield with the Serbian eagle in the contemporary design of the coat of arms of Serbia, following the tradition established by the Kingdom of Serbia of 1882.


Reference: #STL07

Not For Sale

Estimated Value: £200-£250

 
 


Despot Stefan Lazarevic (1402-1427)

Silver "4 lines" coin. 16mm, 0.6g.

Obverse: Serbian legend in 4 lines: NOBA ЦEKA Г NA ДЕС ПОТA (NEW MONEY SIR DESPOT).

Reverse: Christ in glory, blessing with his right hand, holding book of gospels, initials IC XC ("Jesus Christ") in the middle. 3 stars on each side.

Reference: Jov. 41-41, J 175, D260 24-26.

Comment: Very rare and interesting type. The reference to "ЦEKA" or "CEKA" is from Italian Zeccha a contemporary Venetian gold coin deriving its name from the Italian for "mint" or "struck coinage" and often known as the "zecchino". The name of the mint ultimately derives from Arabic: (sikka), meaning a coin mold or die.

The design of the Venetian gold ducat or zecchino, remained unchanged for over 500 years, from its introduction in 1284 to the takeover of Venice by Napoleon in 1797. No other coin design has ever been produced over such a long historical period. The reverse bears a motto in Latin hexameter: Sit tibi, Christe, datus / quem tū regis, iste ducātus ("Christ, let this ducat that you rule be given to you"). Initially called "ducat" (ducato), for the ruling Doge of Venice who was prominently depicted on it, it was called the zecchino, after the Zecca (mint) of Venice. The name of the mint ultimately derives from Arabic: (sikka), meaning a coin mold or die.

Following the Venetian model, similar coins were used for centuries throughout the Mediterranean. After two hundred years of continuous zecchino production, the Byzantine Empire imitated with the basilikon. In 1478, the Ottoman Empire introduced a similar unit. In 1535, the Knights Hospitaller of Malta did so. The Ottoman and the Maltese coins were also gold.

 

Reference: #STL23

Not For Sale

Estimated Value: £200-£300

 
 

Despot Stefan Lazarevic (1402-1427)

Silver tercio (Third of a dinar), 1.02g.

Obverse: A large head of Christ in a granulated nimbus the size of the coin. From the bottom of the head extends a semicircular inscription beginning on the inside with the initials +INRI ("Isus Nazarensis Rex Ideorum" - Jesus the Nazarene the King the god).

Reverse: A cross with arms of equal length, each arm devised into two parts, a dot at the end of each part. From each corner of the cross in the middle of the field extend thin lines ending in the three-dot pattern. Possible representing cross with precious stones or possibly 2 different crossed crosses with gems.

Reference: J 41-10, J 41-15, J (185), I (43.1).

Comment: Extremely rare type. Issued after Stefan Lazarevic became ruler of the Serbian Kingdom. His Christian religious orientation clearly apparent. It is uncertain if this is regular or irregular coining.

There are only 3 registered examples.

Reference: #STL17

Not For Sale

Estimated Value: £200-£300

 
 

Prince Stefan Lazarevic (1389-1402)

Silver "angel" half dinar, 0.75g.

Reverse: An Angel (possibly Archangel Michael) with a granulated nimbus facing left, single wing on the right. In its right hand the angel is holding a branch with 4 buds , itʼs left hand is against his chest. A Latin inscription on the left side next to the branch: CONTE (Prince, Lord or Earl).

Obverse: Christ with a granulated nimbus is depicted standing in mandorla. In his left hand he is holding the gospels, his right hand is in the ritual gesture of benediction. The initials IC XC ("Jesus Christ") at the height of his hips.

Reference: J 41-9.1, J 41-12, J (153), LJ (XI-19), I (42.14), D 229 78,79.

Comment: Extremely rare type. Issued before Stefan Lazarevic became ruler of the Serbian Kingdom, while his mother Milica was ruling. His father died in 1389 and he was too young to rule on his own.

There are only 8 registered examples.

Reference: #STL18

Not For Sale

Estimated Value: £200-£300

 
 


Despot Stefan Lazarevic (1402-1427)

Silver reduced "comet" dinar, 0.5g

Obverse: Despot standing, facing, holding scepter, flying comet or star on the right, Latin legend CONTE (Prince, Duke or Earl)

Reverse: Christ in glory (mandorla), standing, facing, IC XC ("Jesus Christ")

Reference: J 41-9.2, Jov. 41-13

Comment: Extremely rare coin. Very scarce type. Only pictured by Jovanovic. Using CONTE like his father Lazar. 

Stefan Lazarević married Jelena in September 1405. Jelena was daughter of Francesco II Gattilusio, a Genovese lord of Lesbos and a sister of Irene Gattilusio, empress of Byzantium empire and a wife of John VII Palaiologos. This marriage was arranged during his stay in Constantinople in 1402, at a time when the city and the Byzantine Empire ruled John VII in the name of his uncle, Manuel II (1373-1391 ruler, Emperor 1391-1425). Jelena and Stefan had no children and Jelena is not shown on any frescoes in monasteries built by Stefan. 

There are only 2 registered examples.

Reference: #STL02

Not For Sale

Estimated Value: £200-£250

 
 


Despot Stefan Lazarevic (1402-1427)

Silver "sword" dinar, 1.1g

Obverse: Despot standing, facing, holding sword with his right hand. Serbian legend: ГНДЕСП СТЕФ (SIR DESPOT STEFAN).

Reverse: Christ in glory, seating on the throne, initials IC XC ("Jesus Christ").

Reference: Jov. 41-67, Lj (XII-19), I (42.22).

Comment: Very rare sword type. Was only 12 when his father died in the Battle of Kosovo in 1389. His mother Duchess Milica ruled until he was old enough to take over at the age of 25. On July 19th 1427 he died from a heart attack at the age of 50. 


Order info: #STL01. (SOLD)

 
 


Despot Stefan Lazarevic (1402-1427)

Silver "scepter" reduced dinar. 0.5g.

Obverse: Despot standing facing, holding scepter, Latin legend: CONTE STEFAN (Prince or Duke Stefan).

Reverse: Head of facing Christ, cross behind, Latin legend in outer band +IESYS CRISTVS (Jesus Christ).

Reference: J 41-4.1,Jov. 41-7, LJ (XII-1,2), I (42.6). 

Comment: Rare type and a rare depiction of a facing head of Christ including his full name. Rare double struck reverse. 

After Ottoman defeat at Ankara (July 1402) Stefan Lazarevic returned home from the battlefield via Byzantine territory; in August 1402 at Constantinople Emperor John VII Palaiologos decided to award him the very high title of Despot, second only to Imperial dignity, it gave the bearer great honour. From Constantinople, Despot Stefan paved the way for an independent Serbia. 

There are only 29 registered examples.

Reference: #STL03

Not For Sale

Estimated Value: £150-£200

 
 


Despot Stefan Lazarevic (1402-1427)

Silver "scepter" reduced dinar. 0.4g.

Obverse: Despot standing facing, holding scepter, Latin legend: CONTE STEFAN (Prince or Duke Stefan).

Reverse: Head of facing Christ, cross behind, Latin legend in outer band +IESYS CRISTVS (Jesus Christ).

Reference: J 162, Jov. 41-6, I (42.7).

Comment: Like above but with subtle difference like wider Christ beard and different Despot scepter. Still rare type and a rare depiction of a facing head of Christ including his full name.

Under his rule, he issued a Code of Mines in 1412 in Novo Brdo, the economic center of Serbia. In his legacy, Resava-Manasija monastery (Pomoravlje District), he organized the Resava School, a center for correcting, translating, and transcribing books.

 

Order info: #STL04. (SOLD)

 
 


Despot Stefan Lazarevic (1402-1427)

Silver "scepter" reduced dinar. 0.4g.

Obverse: Despot standing facing, holding scepter. Latin legend: CONTE STEFAN (Prince or Duke Stefan).

Reverse: Head of facing Christ, cross behind. Latin legend in outer band +IESYS CRISTVS (Jesus Christ).

Reference: J 162, Jov. 41-6, I (42.7).

Comment: Like above but with Christ more pointy beard. Still rare type and a rare depiction of a facing head of Christ including his full name. 

Stefan Lazarević died suddenly in 1427, leaving the throne to his nephew Đurađ Branković. Despot Stefan is buried in the monastery Manasija built in 1407. 

Order info: #STL05

Not For Sale.

Estimated Value: £100-£200

 
 


Despot Stefan Lazarevic (1402-1427)

Silver "scepter" reduced dinar, struck as prince (1389-1402), 0.4g.

Obverse: Prince standing facing, holding labarum, Latin CONT S - TEFAN (Prince or Duke Stefan).

Reverse: Christ in mandorla, standing, facing, IC - XC ("Jesus Christ") in the middle.

Reference: J 163, Jov. 41-9, I (42.3), D 235 1.

Comment: Very rare type with Despot holding labarum and Christ in mandorla combination.

Despot Stefan Lazarević was a great patron of art and culture providing support and shelter to scholars from Serbia and exiles from surrounding countries occupied by the Ottomans. He was educated at his parents’ home, he spoke and wrote Serbo-Slavic; he could speak Greek, and was familiar with Latin.

He was an author in his own right, and his main works include "Slovo ljubve" (Letter of Love) that he dedicated to his brother Vuk and "Natpis na mramornom stubu na Kosovu" (Inscription on the Marble Pillar at Kosovo). Some of the original works he wrote during his reign have been preserved. 


Order info: #STL12

NotFor Sale.

Estimated Value: £100-£150

 
 


Despot Stefan Lazarevic (1402-1427)

Silver "scepter" coin. 1.3g.

Obverse: Prince standing facing, holding labarum, Serbian Cyrillic legend ДЕСПОТ СТЕФАН (DESPOT STEFAN) 

Reverse: Christ enthroned with Book of Gospels, IC - XC (Jesus Christ) and stars to the sides.

Reference: J 170, Jov. 41-66, LJ (XII-18), I (42.20), D 239 1,2.

Comment: Another rare heavier coin, possibly earlier type.


Reference: #STL13

Not For Sale

Estimated Value: £100-£150

 
 


Despot Stefan Lazarevic (1402-1427)

Silver "scepter" coin. 1g.

Obverse: Prince standing facing, holding labarum. Serbian Cyrillic legend: СТЕФАН ДЕСПОТ (STEFAN DESPOT) .

Reverse: Christ enthroned with book of gospels, IC - XC ("Jesus Christ") above and stars to the sides.

Reference: J 170, Jov. 41-66, LJ (XII-18), I (42.20).

Comment: Another rare heavier coin, possibly earlier type.  


Order info: #STL14. (SOLD)

 
 


Despot Stefan Lazarevic (1402-1427)

silver "4 lines" coin. 0.9g.

Obverse: Serbian legend in 4 lines: + ГНb ДЕСПОТ СТЕФАNb (SIR DESPOT STEFAN)

Reverse: Christ in glory, holding Book of Gospels, initials IC XC ("Jesus Christ") in the middle.

Reference: J 166, Jov. 41-38, LJ (XII-8), I (42.43).

Comment: As the coins over time went lighter and lighter in weight  this example could be an earlier issue.


Order info: #STL15. (SOLD)

 
 


Despot Stefan Lazarevic (1402-1427)

Silver "3 lines" coin. 1g.

Obverse: Serbian Cyrillic legend in 3 lines: ДЕСПОТ (DESPOT).

Reverse: Christ on low-back throne, holding Book of Gospels decorated with 5 gems, initials IC XC ("Jesus Christ") above, lilies to the sides.

Reference: J 187, J 41-42, LJ (XII-20), I(42.49).

Comment: Another heavier letters only example.

Stefan was receptive when Sigismund of Hungary approached him for an alliance. Despot Stefan received Mačva, Belgrade (which became Lazarević's capital in 1405), Golubac (an important fortress on the Danube) and other domains, such as lands in Vojvodina (Zemun, Slankamen, Kupinik, Mitrovica, Bečejand Veliki Bečkerek) in 1404, Apatin in 1417 and Srebrenica in 1411. At Belgrade, he built a fortress with a citadel (which was destroyed during the Great Turkish War in 1690; only the Despot Stefan Tower remains today). 

Reference: #STL16

Not For Sale

Estimated Value: £100-£150

 
 

 

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