Nobleman Vuk Brankovic (1371-1395), silver dinar, 0.6g

Obverse: Serbian legend: +BΛbKb (VUK) in two liens, 3 groups of 3 pellets, control symbol (ibis r. with snake in beak) to lower right

Reverse: Christ enthroned, holding Book of Gospels

Reference: Jov 33-16

Comment: Rare coin with large VUK meaning wolf. Master of Kosovo District Vuk Brankovic ruled for 24 years and survived famous Battle of Kosovo in 1389.  He died October 6th 1397. 

A Serbian medieval nobleman who, during the Fall of the Serbian Empire, inherited a province that extended over present-day southern and southwestern Serbia, the northern part of present day Macedoniaand northern Montenegro. His fief (and later state) was known as Oblast Brankovića (District of Branković) or simply as Vukova zemlja (Vuk's land), which he held with the title of gospodin (lord, sir), under Prince Lazar of Serbia. After the Battle of Kosovo (1389), Vuk was briefly the de facto most powerful Serbian lord. 


Order info: #VUK01, £65

 


Nobleman Vuk Brankovic (1371-1395), silver dinar, 0.9g

Obverse: Serbian legend: +BΛbKb (VUK) in two lines, 3 groups of 3 pellets, control symbol (flowering branch) to lower left

Reverse: Christ enthroned, holding Book of Gospels

Reference: Jov 33-20

Comment: Another example with different symbol. Prince Lazar's son-in-law and ally, Vuk commanded the flank of the Serbian army during the Battle of Kosovo and was the most prominent Christian survivor. 

Branković was born in 1345 and belonged to a Serb noble family which held a prominent role under the Nemanjić dynasty in the 13th and 14th century. Vuk was a son of Branko Mladenović (died before 1365), who received the high court title of sevastokrator from Emperor Stefan Dušan (r. 1331–1355) and served as governor of Ohrid (present day Macedonia). Vuk's grandfather was Mladen (died after 1326), who was župan (count) in Trebinje under King Stefan Milutin (1282–1321) and vojvoda (duke) under King Stefan Dečanski (1321–1331). Later chronicles alleged that the Branković descended from Vukan Nemanjić, son of Stefan Nemanja. 

Order info: #VUK02, £55

 


Nobleman Vuk Brankovic (1371-1395), silver dinar, 0.6g

Obverse: Lion marching to the right, Serbian legend: +BΛbKb (VUK) around

Reverse: Christ enthroned, holding Book of Gospels, IC XC

Reference: LJubic 1875 V, Maric 1956 T XIX 6/4, J 107, Jov 33-5, LJ (XIII-2), I (31.16)

Comment: Extremely rare and hard to find. Only known Vuk coin with lion marching which is very characteristic of his son, Djuradj Brankovic coins.

After the Battle of Kosovo, Vuk refused to become an Ottoman vassal (unlike prince Stefan Lazarević, son of prince Lazar, who became an Ottoman vassal in late 1389), and started to plan anti-Ottoman action together with the Hungarian king Sigismund. However, Vuk was unable to resist the Ottomans for long. In 1392, they captured Skopje and forced Vuk to become their vassal and pay tribute. Even after that Vuk showed some resistance to Ottomans, refusing to participate on the Ottoman side in the battles of Rovine (1395) and Nicopolis (1396), unlike other Serbian lords such as prince Stefan, prince Marko and Konstantin Dejanović. He also maintained contacts with Hungary. Finally the Ottomans ended this situation by attacking Vuk in 1395-96, seizing his land and giving most of it to prince Stefan Lazarević, while Vuk himself was imprisoned and died in an Ottoman prison. A small part of Vuk's land with the towns of Priština and Vučitrn were given to his sons to hold as Ottoman vassals. 


Order info: #VUK03, £150

 


Nobleman Vuk Brankovic (1371-1395), silver dinar under moneyer Jakov, 0.7g

Obverse: Nobleman Vuk standing facing, bareheaded with banner and loros, Cyrillic legend aBΛbKb VΛbKb (VLK VLK) around

Reverse: Christ enthroned, Cyrillic legend JAK Bb

Reference: J 113, Jov 33-26, LJ (XII-25), I (33.2)

Comment: This coin is issued and signed by unknown moneyer Jakov.

The turning point of Vuk's ascension to power in post-Nemanjić Serbia was his marriage with Mara, daughter of the most powerful Serbian magnate prince Lazar Hrebeljanović, which brought him substantial lands in Kosovo and the city of Zvečan as dowry. This marriage sealed the alliance between two houses and secured Lazar's assistance for Vuk's future plans, although Vuk in return had to acknowledge Lazar as his feudal senior. Soon after the marriage, Lazar, Vuk and king Tvrtko I of Bosnia attacked župan Nikola Altomanović, who ruled in the western part of Serbia, and conquered and divided his lands in 1373. In the partition of Altomanović's land, Vuk got areas of Raška (including the old Serbian capital Ras) and lands in Polimlje (northern Montenegro). After the death of Đurađ I Balšić (13 January 1378), Vuk captured his cities of Prizren and Peć and the area of Metohija. At its peak, the realm of Branković stretched from Sjenica in the west to Skopje in the east, with the cities of Priština and Vučitrn serving as its capitals. The most important cities in Vuk's province were Priština, Prizren, Peć, Skopje and Ras, as well as the rich mining settlements of Trepča, Janjevo, Gluhavica and others. 


Order info: #VUK04, £75

 


Nobleman Vuk Brankovic (1371-1395), silver dinar, 1g

Obverse: Nobleman Vuk standing facing, bareheaded with banner and loros, Cyrillic legend aBΛbKb VΛbKb (VUK VUK) around

Reverse: Christ enthroned Reference: Jov 33-24, I (31.6)

Comment: Same as above just without Jakov signature so probably issued by different moneyer.


Order info: #VUK05, £75

 


Nobleman Vuk Brankovic (1371-1395), silver dinar, 0.7g

Obverse: 4-line Serbian legend: +BΛKOBb ΔHИАRb (VUK`S DINAR), followed by two control symbols (moneyer monograms)

Reverse: Christ enthroned, holding Book of Gospels

Reference: J 108, Jov 33-3, LJ (XII-27), I (31.14)

Comment: Rare and first occurrence on medieval Serbian coinage, word "dinar" probably coming from Roman denarius.

 

Order info: #VUK06, £65

 


Nobleman Vuk Brankovic (1371-1395), silver dinar, 0.7g

Obverse: 4-line Serbian legend: +BΛKOBb ΔHИАRb (VUK`S DINAR), followed by two control symbols (moneyer monograms)

Reverse: Christ enthroned, holding Book of Gospels

Reference: J 108, Jov 33-3, LJ (XII-27), I (31.14) 

Comment: Rare and first occurrence on medieval Serbian coinage, word "dinar" probably coming from Roman denarius. This coin was issued by different moneyer from above example.


Order info: #VUK07, £45

 

 

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